Wild Cape Cod Notebook: Spring

We have been back home on Cape Cod for three weeks  and enjoying the onset of the late maritime spring here. This is the first of two posts we will make. May has been a month to witness and follow the arrival of many species of migrants who make chance refueling stops here on the their northerly annual migration. From tiny shorebirds and song birds like the many and varied warblers to larger birds like raptors such as Broad winged hawks and Turkey Vultures. Ospreys actually nest here and are highly visible in their courtship and nesting during the spring. When wind and weather conditions are right these birds can be found in the forested areas all over the Cape. One just has to look for them. As reported in several previous posts, including last year at this time, one of Cape Cod’s most unique wild spots is the incredible Sandy Neck in Barnstable. When our good friend Jose Schmidt visited us recently from Costa Rica we took the opportunity to show him a closer look at wild Cape Cod in spring with a walk down Sandy Neck. Here are some of the highlights of the walk, which Jose calculated was more than 20 kilometers and took the full day.

Sandy neck (8)

Sandy neck (3)

Sandy Neck

 

The shorebird migration is gaining momentum with many birds touching down on Cape Cod to refuel on their way north to Arctic tundra. Some like this American Oystercatcher will stay and likely nest the barrier beaches like Sandy Neck here on Cape Cod. A beautiful sight to see and hear them return.

Oystercatcher Sandy Neck

The majestic osprey are back too nesting on the great marsh here on Sandy Neck.

Chatham in Spring (2)

Tree swallow - Sandy Neck

Tree Swallows are back and nesting in boxes long provided.

Great horned owl - Sandy Neck

Great Horned Owl under siege from a mob of American Crows but unfazed

Sandy Neck May 2014 (7)

Our good friend Jose Schmidt is visiting from Costa Rica and was keen to see the wilder parts of Cape Cod.

Dunlin Sandy Neck

Migrating Dunlin in breeding plumage

Lesser Yellowlegs - Sandy Neck (1)

Lesser yellow legs on the Great Marsh

Merlin - Sandy Neck (1)

Merlin in flight and calling

Diamondback terrapins are among the most variable turtle species in North America and no two individuals are exactly alike in coloration and pattern. The feet are strongly webbed; the hind feet are especially large and flat. These large webbed feet and muscular legs enable terrapins to be strong swimmers, an ability needed when living in an environment with daily tidal changes and strong currents. Mating takes place in the early spring, with nesting extending through mid-summer. Females lay two to three clutches of eggs annually. Clutch size ranges from four to 23 eggs, and varies throughout the terrapin’s range. This little fella might be just hours old! We found him walking own the path looking to get to salt water where we ended up placing him not far away.

Terrapin - Sandy NeckTerrapin - Sandy Neck (1)

Terrapin - Sandy Neck (3)

Backyard birding (3) copy

Hunting Red Tailed Hawk

Otter tracks Sandy Neck

River Otter Tracks

Pine warbler Sandy Neck

Pine Warbler in the forest

Sandy Neck (2)

We noted the Eastern coyote tracks or “coywolf” that some naturalist have come to refer to the coyotes in our area. This track was placed on top of our own tracks from earlier in the day indicating that the coyotes were very close by as we passed but we did not see them. The critters are about the size of a German Shepard dog and weigh 50 – 60 lbs. Very successful scavengers. See below image taken at a different time and place (Chatham) so you can see them.

coyote

Sandy neck (2)Sandy neck

A beautiful female Merlin was hunting as we trekked by the scrub pines.

Sandy neck (7)

After 10 hours and more than 20 kilometers we finally reached the last resting spot …a rock which I had pointed out at the beginning of the hike. A beautiful day in wild Cape Cod. Love the spring here!

Sandy Neck May 2014 (13)

    2 Responses to “Wild Cape Cod Notebook: Spring”

  1. May 25, 2014 | Reply
    Maureen says:

    John, what wonderful photographs!! Thank you for posting
    them, so we can learn & enjoy too!

  2. May 26, 2014 | Reply
    Jose Schmidt says:

    Wonderful pictures John, I was a little tired at the end of the day…
    Thank you for one of my best experiences in USA , but more important to me, thank you for your hospitality.

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